<span itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/InformAction"><span style="display:none" itemprop="about" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Thing/Notification"><meta itemprop="description" content="Notification"/></span><span itemprop="object" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Event"><div style=""><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="8" border="0" summary="" style="width:100%;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;border:1px Solid #ccc;border-width:1px 2px 2px 1px;background-color:#fff;"><tr><td><meta itemprop="eventStatus" content="http://schema.org/EventScheduled"/><div style="padding:2px"><span itemprop="publisher" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Organization"><meta itemprop="name" content="Google Calendar"/></span><meta itemprop="eventId/googleCalendar" content="7tvr73dl1rp8bo49519nb3970p"/><div style="float:right;font-weight:bold;font-size:13px"> <a href="https://protect-au.mimecast.com/s/QehOC2xZYvCypozvcnNK5t?domain=google.com" style="color:#20c;white-space:nowrap" itemprop="url">more details »</a><br></div><h3 style="padding:0 0 6px 0;margin:0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:16px;font-weight:bold;color:#222"><span itemprop="name">Carolyn Dicey Jennings (UC Merced)</span></h3><div style="padding-bottom:15px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222;white-space:pre-wrap!important;white-space:-moz-pre-wrap!important;white-space:-pre-wrap!important;white-space:-o-pre-wrap!important;white-space:pre;word-wrap:break-word"><span>Title: From Attention to Self<p><br>Abstract: A popular view of the self is that it exists inside the head. Movies sometimes present the self as a tiny person living inside of our skulls, seeing the world through our eyes. However, this concept of a 'homunculus,' or little human, is not popular in contemporary philosophy of mind and cognitive science. It has a serious problem: it is used to explain how it is that we see, hear, and engage with the world by introducing a new being that sees, hears, and engages with the world. If this worked then we would need homunculi "all the way down" to account for the seeing, hearing, and engagement of each. Philosophers and cognitive scientists seem to fear that any brain-based account of the self will have this problem. Within these fields, you will find discussions of the narrative self, the illusory self, the constructed self, the imaginary self, the self concept, and self as center of narrative gravity. These are not really theories of self, but of self image. In this talk, I aim to provide a brain-based account of the self while avoiding the 'homunculus fallacy.' As I will argue, the existence of an emergent self with its own causal powers is the best explanation of the phenomenon of top-down control in attention. I will contrast this account with that of Jonardon Ganeri in his new book, Attention, Not Self (OUP, 2017). <br>NB: Tea starts at 3pm<br></p></span><meta itemprop="description" content="Title: From Attention to Self


Abstract: A popular view of the self is that it exists inside the head. Movies sometimes present the self as a tiny person living inside of our skulls, seeing the world through our eyes. However, this concept of a 'homunculus,' or little human, is not popular in contemporary philosophy of mind and cognitive science. It has a serious problem: it is used to explain how it is that we see, hear, and engage with the world by introducing a new being that sees, hears, and engages with the world. If this worked then we would need homunculi "all the way down" to account for the seeing, hearing, and engagement of each. Philosophers and cognitive scientists seem to fear that any brain-based account of the self will have this problem. Within these fields, you will find discussions of the narrative self, the illusory self, the constructed self, the imaginary self, the self concept, and self as center of narrative gravity. These are not really theories of self, but of self image. In this talk, I aim to provide a brain-based account of the self while avoiding the 'homunculus fallacy.' As I will argue, the existence of an emergent self with its own causal powers is the best explanation of the phenomenon of top-down control in attention. I will contrast this account with that of Jonardon Ganeri in his new book, Attention, Not Self (OUP, 2017). 
NB: Tea starts at 3pm
"/></div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" border="0" summary="Event details"><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">When</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top"><time itemprop="startDate" datetime="20190508T053000Z"></time><time itemprop="endDate" datetime="20190508T070000Z"></time>Wed 8 May 2019 15:30 – 17:00 <span style="color:#888">Eastern Australia Time - Sydney</span></td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">Where</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top"><span itemprop="location" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Place"><span itemprop="name" class="notranslate">Muniment Room, University of Sydney</span><span dir="ltr"> (<a href="https://protect-au.mimecast.com/s/Kc6fC5QZ29FNZYLoI22Avi?domain=maps.google.com" style="color:#20c;white-space:nowrap" target="_blank" itemprop="map">map</a>)</span></span></td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">Calendar</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top">Seminars</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">Who</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tr><td style="padding-right:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222"><span style="font-family:Courier New,monospace">&#x2022;</span></td><td style="padding-right:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222"><div><div style="margin:0 0 0.3em 0"><span class="notranslate">Luara Ferracioli</span><span style="font-size:11px;color:#888">- creator</span></div></div></td></tr></table></td></tr></table></div></td></tr><tr><td style="background-color:#f6f6f6;color:#888;border-top:1px Solid #ccc;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:11px"><p>Invitation from <a href="https://protect-au.mimecast.com/s/sRgRC3Q8Z2FNpYzwIqAeu-?domain=google.com" target="_blank" style="">Google Calendar</a></p><p>You are receiving this email at the account sydphil@arts.usyd.edu.au because you are subscribed for notifications on calendar Seminars.</p><p>To stop receiving these emails, please log in to <a href="https://protect-au.mimecast.com/s/sRgRC3Q8Z2FNpYzwIqAeu-?domain=google.com">https://www.google.com/calendar/</a> and change your notification settings for this calendar.</p><p>Forwarding this invitation could allow any recipient to send a response to the organiser and be added to the guest list, invite others regardless of their own invitation status or to modify your RSVP. <a href="https://protect-au.mimecast.com/s/4FFUC4QZ1RFkBAKysBqw3n?domain=support.google.com">Learn more</a>.</p></td></tr></table></div></span></span>