<span itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/InformAction"><span style="display:none" itemprop="about" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Thing/Notification"><meta itemprop="description" content="Notification"/></span><span itemprop="object" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Event"><div style=""><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="8" border="0" summary="" style="width:100%;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;border:1px Solid #ccc;border-width:1px 2px 2px 1px;background-color:#fff;"><tr><td><meta itemprop="eventStatus" content="http://schema.org/EventScheduled"/><div style="padding:2px"><span itemprop="publisher" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Organization"><meta itemprop="name" content="Google Calendar"/></span><meta itemprop="eventId/googleCalendar" content="_64oj2cpp6t0j8ba46ks3ib9k89338b9o6133ib9l6sq3cgi165230cpn8g"/><div style="float:right;font-weight:bold;font-size:13px"> <a style="color:#20c;white-space:nowrap" itemprop="url" href="https://protect-au.mimecast.com/s/87W8BlUGRqEeUE?domain=google.com">more details »</a><br></div><h3 style="padding:0 0 6px 0;margin:0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:16px;font-weight:bold;color:#222"><span itemprop="name">Alexander Klimenko</span></h3><div style="padding-bottom:15px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222;white-space:pre-wrap!important;white-space:-moz-pre-wrap!important;white-space:-pre-wrap!important;white-space:-o-pre-wrap!important;white-space:pre;word-wrap:break-word"><span>The direction of time and thermodynamic invariance<p> <br />The physical mechanisms enacting the direction of time remain one of the most guarded secrets of nature. In this presentation we try to look into these secrets and explore the hypothesis that the perceived direction of time has thermodynamic origins. Over the years, this hypothesis was advocated by a number of prominent scientists (e.g. Boltzmann, Hawking) but is still not widely known.  There are two reasons behind this. First, overwhelming majority of people (including most physicists) tend to implicitly accept “the natural flow of time” based on common intuition as a working model.  Second, accepting one hypothesis or the other does not seem to have any practical implications --- nether of the assumptions is seen to produce a testable physical theory capable of discriminating these assumptions. So far, consistent investigation of the nature of time has been largely confined to the domain of philosophy, where numerous attempts to build a logical scheme around our intuitive perception of time have faced mounting difficulties. <br /> <br />It appears, however, that Boltzmann’s time hypothesis does have physical implications and does raise important questions. If this hypothesis is accepted, thermodynamics can have two possible versions with respect to matter/antimatter duality --- symmetric (CP-invariant) and antisymmetric (CPT-invariant).   These versions are mutually incompatible and only one of them can be real. The choice between these versions can be tested experimentally, although this is not a simple matter, even at the present level of technology. In this presentation we will discuss the direction of time and explore implications of these versions of thermodynamics. </p></span><meta itemprop="description" content="The direction of time and thermodynamic invariance

 
The physical mechanisms enacting the direction of time remain one of the most guarded secrets of nature. In this presentation we try to look into these secrets and explore the hypothesis that the perceived direction of time has thermodynamic origins. Over the years, this hypothesis was advocated by a number of prominent scientists (e.g. Boltzmann, Hawking) but is still not widely known.  There are two reasons behind this. First, overwhelming majority of people (including most physicists) tend to implicitly accept “the natural flow of time” based on common intuition as a working model.  Second, accepting one hypothesis or the other does not seem to have any practical implications --- nether of the assumptions is seen to produce a testable physical theory capable of discriminating these assumptions. So far, consistent investigation of the nature of time has been largely confined to the domain of philosophy, where numerous attempts to build a logical scheme around our intuitive perception of time have faced mounting difficulties. 
 
It appears, however, that Boltzmann’s time hypothesis does have physical implications and does raise important questions. If this hypothesis is accepted, thermodynamics can have two possible versions with respect to matter/antimatter duality --- symmetric (CP-invariant) and antisymmetric (CPT-invariant).   These versions are mutually incompatible and only one of them can be real. The choice between these versions can be tested experimentally, although this is not a simple matter, even at the present level of technology. In this presentation we will discuss the direction of time and explore implications of these versions of thermodynamics. "/></div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" border="0" summary="Event details"><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">When</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top"><time itemprop="startDate" datetime="20171214T040000Z"></time><time itemprop="endDate" datetime="20171214T053000Z"></time>Thu 14 Dec 2017 15:00 – 16:30 <span style="color:#888">Eastern Time - Melbourne, Sydney</span></td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">Calendar</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top">Current Projects</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">Who</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tr><td style="padding-right:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222"><span style="font-family:Courier New,monospace">&#x2022;</span></td><td style="padding-right:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222"><div><div style="margin:0 0 0.3em 0"><span class="notranslate">Kristie Miller</span><span style="font-size:11px;color:#888">- creator</span></div></div></td></tr></table></td></tr></table></div></td></tr><tr><td style="background-color:#f6f6f6;color:#888;border-top:1px Solid #ccc;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:11px"><p>Invitation from <a style="" href="https://protect-au.mimecast.com/s/Qv1bBRfW70KQTb?domain=google.com" target="_blank">Google Calendar</a></p><p>You are receiving this email at the account sydphil@arts.usyd.edu.au because you are subscribed for notifications on calendar Current Projects.</p><p>To stop receiving these emails, please log in to <a href="https://protect-au.mimecast.com/s/Qv1bBRfW70KQTb?domain=google.com">https://www.google.com/calendar/</a> and change your notification settings for this calendar.</p><p>Forwarding this invitation could allow any recipient to modify your RSVP response. <a href="https://protect-au.mimecast.com/s/xMnXB1UMqnmafn?domain=support.google.com">Learn More</a>.</p></td></tr></table></div></span></span>