<div dir="ltr"><p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:16px"><strong>UOW Philosophy Research Seminar Presents:</strong><br></p><p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:16px"><em>Ahimsa and The Moral Status of Animals</em></p><p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:16px"> <br></p><p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:16px">Speaker: Dr. Bronwyn Finnigan (ANU)</p><p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:16px">Date: 6 September 2017</p><p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:16px">Time: 15.30-16.45</p><p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:16px">Venue: 67.202 (Moot Court)</p><p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:16px"><strong>Note change of venue to the Moot Court 67.202</strong></p><p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:16px"> </p><p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:16px">Aimed at staff and postgraduates, but open to all.</p><p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:16px"> </p><p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:16px"><strong>Abstract</strong>: Ahimsa, or non-violence, is a central virtue in Buddhist, Jain and Brahmanical traditions of Indian philosophy. In this presentation, I will provide some background to the Buddhist position on this idea and will rationally reconstruct five Buddhist arguments that aim to justify its extension to animals. These arguments will appeal to the capacity and desire not to suffer, the virtue of compassion, as well as Buddhist views on the nature of self, karma, and reincarnation. I will also consider how versions of these arguments have been applied to address a practical issue in Buddhist ethics; whether Buddhists should be vegetarian.<br></p><p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:16px"><br></p><p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:16px"><br></p><p style="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px;color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:Calibri,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:16px">With very best wishes</p><div><div class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><div><span style="color:rgb(0,0,0)"><font face="garamond, serif"><b>Dr. Michael D. Kirchhoff </b></font></span></div><div><span style="color:rgb(0,0,0)"><font face="garamond, serif">Lecturer in Philosophy</font></span></div><font face="garamond, serif"><span style="color:rgb(0,0,0)">School of Humanities and Social Enquiry</span><br style="color:rgb(0,0,0)"><span style="color:rgb(0,0,0)">Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts</span><br style="color:rgb(0,0,0)"><span style="color:rgb(0,0,0)">University of Wollongong NSW 2522</span><br style="color:rgb(0,0,0)"><span style="color:rgb(0,0,0)">Australia</span></font><br></div></div></div>
</div>