<span itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/InformAction"><span style="display:none" itemprop="about" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Thing/Notification"><meta itemprop="description" content="Notification"/></span><span itemprop="object" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Event"><div style=""><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="8" border="0" summary="" style="width:100%;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;border:1px Solid #ccc;border-width:1px 2px 2px 1px;background-color:#fff;"><tr><td><meta itemprop="eventStatus" content="http://schema.org/EventScheduled"/><div style="padding:2px"><span itemprop="publisher" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Organization"><meta itemprop="name" content="Google Calendar"/></span><meta itemprop="eventId/googleCalendar" content="_6opkcg9o6t0k4ba284s32b9k6go3eb9p64r44ba66t33ig9g6p0jcg9o68"/><div style="float:right;font-weight:bold;font-size:13px"> <a href="https://www.google.com/calendar/event?action=VIEW&eid=XzZvcGtjZzlvNnQwazRiYTI4NHMzMmI5azZnbzNlYjlwNjRyNDRiYTY2dDMzaWc5ZzZwMGpjZzlvNjggZmV2MWxkcjRsa2h2MDM2b2U0aW4yanR0ZGdAZw" style="color:#20c;white-space:nowrap" itemprop="url">more details »</a><br></div><h3 style="padding:0 0 6px 0;margin:0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:16px;font-weight:bold;color:#222"><span itemprop="name">Daniel Wodak</span></h3><div style="padding-bottom:15px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222;white-space:pre-wrap!important;white-space:-moz-pre-wrap!important;white-space:-pre-wrap!important;white-space:-o-pre-wrap!important;white-space:pre;word-wrap:break-word"><span>Normative Testimony Gives Us Reasons for Attitudes <p>Abstract: If a reliable testifier tells you that a painting is beautiful, or that an agent’s act is wrong, do you thereby have a reason to admire the painting or blame the agent? Much recent work in metaethics and aesthetics insists that the answer is No; indeed, this answer is often treated as a data point in the literatures on moral and aesthetic testimony. I will argue once we correct for a common methodological mistake in these literatures, the answer must be Yes. I argue that this result undermines four of the most common solutions to the puzzle posed by moral and aesthetic testimony.</p></span><meta itemprop="description" content="Normative Testimony Gives Us Reasons for Attitudes 

Abstract: If a reliable testifier tells you that a painting is beautiful, or that an agent’s act is wrong, do you thereby have a reason to admire the painting or blame the agent? Much recent work in metaethics and aesthetics insists that the answer is No; indeed, this answer is often treated as a data point in the literatures on moral and aesthetic testimony. I will argue once we correct for a common methodological mistake in these literatures, the answer must be Yes. I argue that this result undermines four of the most common solutions to the puzzle posed by moral and aesthetic testimony."/></div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" border="0" summary="Event details"><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">When</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top"><time itemprop="startDate" datetime="20170810T050000Z"></time><time itemprop="endDate" datetime="20170810T063000Z"></time>Thu 10 Aug 2017 15:00 – 16:30 <span style="color:#888">Eastern Time - Melbourne, Sydney</span></td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">Calendar</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top">Current Projects</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">Who</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tr><td style="padding-right:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222"><span style="font-family:Courier New,monospace">&#x2022;</span></td><td style="padding-right:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222"><div><div style="margin:0 0 0.3em 0"><span class="notranslate">Kristie Miller</span><span style="font-size:11px;color:#888">- creator</span></div></div></td></tr></table></td></tr></table></div></td></tr><tr><td style="background-color:#f6f6f6;color:#888;border-top:1px Solid #ccc;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:11px"><p>Invitation from <a href="https://www.google.com/calendar/" target="_blank" style="">Google Calendar</a></p><p>You are receiving this email at the account sydphil@arts.usyd.edu.au because you are subscribed for notifications on calendar Current Projects.</p><p>To stop receiving these emails, please log in to https://www.google.com/calendar/ and change your notification settings for this calendar.</p><p>Forwarding this invitation could allow any recipient to modify your RSVP response. <a href="https://support.google.com/calendar/answer/37135#forwarding">Learn More</a>.</p></td></tr></table></div></span></span>