<span itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/InformAction"><span style="display:none" itemprop="about" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Thing/Notification"><meta itemprop="description" content="Notification"/></span><span itemprop="object" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Event"><div style=""><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="8" border="0" summary="" style="width:100%;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;border:1px Solid #ccc;border-width:1px 2px 2px 1px;background-color:#fff;"><tr><td><meta itemprop="eventStatus" content="http://schema.org/EventScheduled"/><div style="padding:2px"><span itemprop="publisher" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Organization"><meta itemprop="name" content="Google Calendar"/></span><meta itemprop="eventId/googleCalendar" content="1497746196989"/><div style="float:right;font-weight:bold;font-size:13px"> <a href="https://www.google.com/calendar/event?action=VIEW&eid=MTQ5Nzc0NjE5Njk4OSAybWU3YzdmcjNvbXBsNHJodmtwbWxhNTM2OEBn" style="color:#20c;white-space:nowrap" itemprop="url">more details »</a><br></div><h3 style="padding:0 0 6px 0;margin:0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:16px;font-weight:bold;color:#222"><span itemprop="name">Una Stojnic</span></h3><div style="padding-bottom:15px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222;white-space:pre-wrap!important;white-space:-moz-pre-wrap!important;white-space:-pre-wrap!important;white-space:-o-pre-wrap!important;white-space:pre;word-wrap:break-word"><span>Vague Utterances in Context<p>“John is tall” is both context-sensitive and vague. Yet we can communicate with it even if no one knows how tall is tall or how tall John is. How then do we reconcile the idea that such utterances convey information, with the idea that they exhibit vagueness? We argue that contextual resolution of words like “tall” is determined by mechanisms of discourse coherence that specify the linguistic relations utterances containing them bear to prior discourse and the real-world situation they are embedded in. This allows us to explain how such utterances can have precise truth-conditions, yet exhibit vagueness: agents typically have incomplete information about the standards set by mechanisms of discourse coherence. It also elegantly captures the distinctive roles such utterances can play in communication: they can serve to make a useful distinction among the relevant class of individuals, as well as to refine our understanding of the contextual standards.</p></span><meta itemprop="description" content="Vague Utterances in Context

“John is tall” is both context-sensitive and vague. Yet we can communicate with it even if no one knows how tall is tall or how tall John is. How then do we reconcile the idea that such utterances convey information, with the idea that they exhibit vagueness? We argue that contextual resolution of words like “tall” is determined by mechanisms of discourse coherence that specify the linguistic relations utterances containing them bear to prior discourse and the real-world situation they are embedded in. This allows us to explain how such utterances can have precise truth-conditions, yet exhibit vagueness: agents typically have incomplete information about the standards set by mechanisms of discourse coherence. It also elegantly captures the distinctive roles such utterances can play in communication: they can serve to make a useful distinction among the relevant class of individuals, as well as to refine our understanding of the contextual standards."/></div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" border="0" summary="Event details"><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">When</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top"><time itemprop="startDate" datetime="20170809T030000Z"></time><time itemprop="endDate" datetime="20170809T043000Z"></time>Wed 9 Aug 2017 13:00 – 14:30 <span style="color:#888">Eastern Time - Melbourne, Sydney</span></td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">Calendar</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top">Seminars</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">Who</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tr><td style="padding-right:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222"><span style="font-family:Courier New,monospace">&#x2022;</span></td><td style="padding-right:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222"><div><div style="margin:0 0 0.3em 0"><span class="notranslate">Sam Shpall</span><span style="font-size:11px;color:#888">- creator</span></div></div></td></tr></table></td></tr></table></div></td></tr><tr><td style="background-color:#f6f6f6;color:#888;border-top:1px Solid #ccc;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:11px"><p>Invitation from <a href="https://www.google.com/calendar/" target="_blank" style="">Google Calendar</a></p><p>You are receiving this email at the account sydphil@arts.usyd.edu.au because you are subscribed for notifications on calendar Seminars.</p><p>To stop receiving these emails, please log in to https://www.google.com/calendar/ and change your notification settings for this calendar.</p><p>Forwarding this invitation could allow any recipient to modify your RSVP response. <a href="https://support.google.com/calendar/answer/37135#forwarding">Learn More</a>.</p></td></tr></table></div></span></span>