<span itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/InformAction"><span style="display:none" itemprop="about" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Thing/Notification"><meta itemprop="description" content="Notification"/></span><span itemprop="object" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Event"><div style=""><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="8" border="0" summary="" style="width:100%;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;border:1px Solid #ccc;border-width:1px 2px 2px 1px;background-color:#fff;"><tr><td><meta itemprop="eventStatus" content="http://schema.org/EventScheduled"/><div style="padding:2px"><span itemprop="publisher" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Organization"><meta itemprop="name" content="Google Calendar"/></span><meta itemprop="eventId/googleCalendar" content="1497746196987"/><div style="float:right;font-weight:bold;font-size:13px"> <a href="https://www.google.com/calendar/event?action=VIEW&eid=MTQ5Nzc0NjE5Njk4NyAybWU3YzdmcjNvbXBsNHJodmtwbWxhNTM2OEBn" style="color:#20c;white-space:nowrap" itemprop="url">more details »</a><br></div><h3 style="padding:0 0 6px 0;margin:0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:16px;font-weight:bold;color:#222"><span itemprop="name">Hanti Lin</span></h3><div style="padding-bottom:15px;font-size:13px;color:#222;white-space:pre-wrap!important;white-space:-moz-pre-wrap!important;white-space:-pre-wrap!important;white-space:-o-pre-wrap!important;white-space:pre;word-wrap:break-word"><span>The Problem of Induction, Hume's Dilemma, and the Normative Turn<p>Hanti Lin (UC Davis)<p>The problem of induction is the general problem of justifying at least some kind of induction and, hopefully, justifying many of those that have been used in science. But is it possible to justify at least some? Hume's dilemma tries to answer in the negative. A simple version goes like this: "To justify a certain kind of induction, the (empirical) thesis that it will lead to a true conclusion has to be argued for, either demonstratively or inductively; the demonstrative route is impossible, while the inductive route is circular." In reply to this dilemma, I want to defend a general escape route that Reichenbach has briefly pointed out. The idea is that, to justify a certain kind of induction, we can argue for a non-empirical, normative thesis instead, a norm that guides some inductive practices. Call this the normative turn, which has been implemented consciously or unconsciously by some formal epistemologists, such as Bayesians, learning theorists, and Reichenbach himself. Unfortunately, they tend to set aside Hume's dilemma quickly and rush to develop their particular implementations of the normative turn. What I want to do for them is to slow down, consider possible ways Hume's dilemma might be thought to strike back, and address those worries by reference to the general features of the normative turn, without commitment to any particular implementation. Here is the lesson to be drawn: The problem of induction is difficult; Hume's dilemma represents a difficulty involved; the normative turn escapes Hume's dilemma and helps us identify the more important difficulties to be addressed.</p></p></span><meta itemprop="description" content="The Problem of Induction, Hume's Dilemma, and the Normative Turn

Hanti Lin (UC Davis)

The problem of induction is the general problem of justifying at least some kind of induction and, hopefully, justifying many of those that have been used in science. But is it possible to justify at least some? Hume's dilemma tries to answer in the negative. A simple version goes like this: "To justify a certain kind of induction, the (empirical) thesis that it will lead to a true conclusion has to be argued for, either demonstratively or inductively; the demonstrative route is impossible, while the inductive route is circular." In reply to this dilemma, I want to defend a general escape route that Reichenbach has briefly pointed out. The idea is that, to justify a certain kind of induction, we can argue for a non-empirical, normative thesis instead, a norm that guides some inductive practices. Call this the normative turn, which has been implemented consciously or unconsciously by some formal epistemologists, such as Bayesians, learning theorists, and Reichenbach himself. Unfortunately, they tend to set aside Hume's dilemma quickly and rush to develop their particular implementations of the normative turn. What I want to do for them is to slow down, consider possible ways Hume's dilemma might be thought to strike back, and address those worries by reference to the general features of the normative turn, without commitment to any particular implementation. Here is the lesson to be drawn: The problem of induction is difficult; Hume's dilemma represents a difficulty involved; the normative turn escapes Hume's dilemma and helps us identify the more important difficulties to be addressed."/></div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" border="0" summary="Event details"><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">When</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top"><time itemprop="startDate" datetime="20170802T030000Z"></time><time itemprop="endDate" datetime="20170802T043000Z"></time>Wed 2 Aug 2017 13:00 – 14:30 <span style="color:#888">Eastern Time - Melbourne, Sydney</span></td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">Where</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top"><span itemprop="location" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Place"><span itemprop="name" class="notranslate">Muniment Room, Sydney Uni</span><span dir="ltr"> (<a href="https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Muniment+Room,+Sydney+Uni&hl=en-GB" style="color:#20c;white-space:nowrap" target="_blank" itemprop="map">map</a>)</span></span></td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">Calendar</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top">Seminars</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 1em 10px 0;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#888;white-space:nowrap" valign="top"><div><i style="font-style:normal">Who</i></div></td><td style="padding-bottom:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222" valign="top"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tr><td style="padding-right:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222"><span style="font-family:Courier New,monospace">&#x2022;</span></td><td style="padding-right:10px;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:13px;color:#222"><div><div style="margin:0 0 0.3em 0"><span class="notranslate">Sam Shpall</span><span style="font-size:11px;color:#888">- creator</span></div></div></td></tr></table></td></tr></table></div></td></tr><tr><td style="background-color:#f6f6f6;color:#888;border-top:1px Solid #ccc;font-family:Arial,Sans-serif;font-size:11px"><p>Invitation from <a href="https://www.google.com/calendar/" target="_blank" style="">Google Calendar</a></p><p>You are receiving this email at the account sydphil@arts.usyd.edu.au because you are subscribed for notifications on calendar Seminars.</p><p>To stop receiving these emails, please log in to https://www.google.com/calendar/ and change your notification settings for this calendar.</p><p>Forwarding this invitation could allow any recipient to modify your RSVP response. <a href="https://support.google.com/calendar/answer/37135#forwarding">Learn More</a>.</p></td></tr></table></div></span></span>