<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html charset=utf-8"></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div class=""><div style="margin: 0px; font-size: 14px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue';" class="">Dear all</div><div style="margin: 0px; font-size: 14px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue';" class=""><br class=""></div><div style="margin: 0px; font-size: 14px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue';" class="">Tomorrow’s current projects seminar @ 3.00 in the Muniment Room will be Lok-Chi Chan giving the following paper:</div><div style="margin: 0px; font-size: 14px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue';" class=""><br class=""></div><div style="margin: 0px; font-size: 14px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue';" class="">Can the Russellian monist escape the epiphenomenalist’s paradox?</div><div style="margin: 0px; font-size: 14px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue'; min-height: 16px;" class=""><br class=""></div><div style="margin: 0px; font-size: 14px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue';" class="">Lok-Chi Chan</div><div style="margin: 0px; font-size: 14px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue'; min-height: 16px;" class=""><br class=""></div><div style="margin: 0px; font-size: 14px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue';" class="">University of Sydney</div><div style="margin: 0px; font-size: 14px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue'; min-height: 16px;" class=""><br class=""></div><div style="margin: 0px; font-size: 14px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue';" class="">Abstract: Russellian monism – an influential doctrine proposed by Russell (1927) – is roughly the view that physics can only ever tell us about the causal, dispositional, and spatiotemporal properties of physical entities and not their categorical (or intrinsic) properties, whereas our qualia are constituted by those categorical properties. In this paper, I will discuss the relation between Russellian monism and a seminal paradox facing epiphenomenalism, the paradox of phenomenal judgment. The paradox is (roughly) as follows: if epiphenomenalism is true – qualia are causally inefficacious – then any belief or memory about qualia, including epiphenomenalism itself, cannot be caused by qualia. For many writers, including Hawthrone (2001), Smart (2004), and Braddon-Mitchell and Jackson (2007), Russellian monism faces the same paradox as epiphenomenalism does. I will assess Chalmers (1996) and Seager’s (2009) defences of Russellian monism against the paradox, and will put forward a novel argument against those defences.</div></div><div style="margin: 0px; font-size: 14px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue';" class=""><br class=""></div><div style="margin: 0px; font-size: 14px; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue';" class="">All are welcome.</div><br class=""><div apple-content-edited="true" class="">
<div style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); letter-spacing: normal; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: -webkit-auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class=""><div class="">Associate Professor Kristie Miller<br class="">Senior ARC Research Fellow</div><div class="">Joint Director, the Centre for Time<br class="">School of Philosophical and Historical&nbsp;Inquiry and<br class="">The Centre for Time<br class="">The University of Sydney<br class="">Sydney Australia<br class="">Room S212, A 14<br class=""><br class=""><a href="mailto:kmiller@usyd.edu.au" class="">kmiller@usyd.edu.au</a><br class="">kristie_miller@yahoo.com<br class="">Ph:&nbsp;+612 9036 9663<br class="">http://www.kristiemiller.net/KristieMiller2/Home_Page.html<br class=""><br class=""><br class=""><br class=""><br class=""><br class=""><br class=""><br class=""><br class=""><br class=""><br class=""></div><div class=""><br class=""></div></div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"></div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"></div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"></div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><br class="Apple-interchange-newline">
</div>
<br class=""></body></html>